Read an E-Book Week 2015 on Smashwords

readanebookweekIt’s read an E-Book week at Smashwords. From March 1st through March 7th, there are tons of free books to read and download for your enjoyment.

Here’s a link to the Smashwords Read an E-Book Week Catalog, listing all the free titles enrolled in Read An E-Book Week 2015:
http://www.smashwords.com/books/category/1/newest/1

And here’s a link to my author page, where you can download all my stuff for free during the promotion:
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/beezul

Enjoy the reading and spread the word.

raebw2015(2)

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The True Nature Of Father Time – a science fiction story

The True Nature Of Father TimeTHE TRUE NATURE OF FATHER TIME

Chron-OmiTar twitched with annoyance at the insistent warning tingle in his awareness. Overlaying his temporal display onto his main sensors he evaluated his track again. There it was. The cause of the alert. A discrepancy between his current and his projected position on the grid of his route. A difference of eleven discrete temporal elements. He was annoyed because he was partially to blame for it. On the temporal display his next waypoint pulsed green. It located a small blue world in a minor star system within one of the smaller arms of the great spiral galaxy that was his domain. Automatically he re-calculated velocities, set a new trajectory and adjusted his progress, thinking about the species on that world he was tasked to protect. They were the youngest, a late addition to the long list of those he had minded over the eons past.

That was what he was. A minder of the great spiral known to the blue world entities as the Milky Way. He found the name quaint. In fact, he found much of their nomenclature amusing, having absorbed all their collective knowledge as part of his ongoing task. The galaxy was anything but milky from his perspective, although it might appear an opaque smudge to something viewing it from a world in that system.They called their system Sol, and he adopted this name too for convenience, although he knew the system by a different name.

He himself was a creation of the Originators, who fashioned him and others like him upon discovering viable seed intelligences in the far-flung star clusters of the universe. On those selected worlds they embedded twinned energy crystals far beneath one of the magnetic poles and aligned them to keep that world tilted in relation to its star. Thus they could bring about a regular cycle of seasons. Chron-OmiTar and his like were designed to monitor and maintain the energy crystals on all the seed worlds and assigned different sectors of space and time that never overlapped.

His designated sector was the Milky Way galaxy and his task was to make an infinite round of the seed worlds on that track, adjusting the alignment of their crystals once every solar cycle. Right now he was headed for a blue world in the Sol system whose inhabitants celebrated his arrival at an annual festival marking the end of their seasonal cycle, although they were unaware of his true nature. At the winter solstice marking his passage, they celebrated and paid their respects to Father Time, by which name they venerated him. But they could neither see him nor know him. Even though he could take their form if he willed it, it was forbidden. There was no bridge spanning the vast gulf separating his kind from those they minded.

Chron-OmiTar had never met another minder. The nature of their task and their appointed galactic routes ensured this. Often, he let the power of his considerable awareness roam free as he traversed his path, casting a wide net among the edges of the far-flung star clusters he passed by. In all his travels over the eons he never discovered any sign of another until his searching had become a matter of rote. But now, the unthinkable had happened. One of his random scans returned a faint disturbance in the flow of his awareness, so faint that he might have missed it, except it was not supposed to be there. A brush against a kindred intelligence somewhere out in the neighboring Andromeda galaxy, just two and a half million light years from his position. It lingered briefly and then disappeared in the background chatter in spite of his best efforts at triangulating it. In vain he bent the interstices of his track in space-time, trying to glimpse the path of the other. He could not maintain the singularity he created long enough to probe further and his manipulations caused his own path to warp dangerously, putting him out of sync with his appointed course.

His temporal display showed that the blue world was diverging from the path of synchronicity as it approached perihelion. He would have to summon all his resources to make up the lost time. Concentrating, he poured his energies into a new intercept vector, wondering about the consequences of a failure to make his rendezvous with the planet’s crystals. Such an event had never happened. Not in all the history of the minders. No relevant data existed in his awareness but Chron-OmiTar knew by extrapolation that such a failure would undo all his patient work of many cycles as the seasons failed and synchronicity disappeared. It would mean the eventual end of the unfortunate species in question.

Continuously re-calculating his velocity and trajectory, he approached Sol system’s heliopause, vaulting easily over the swarm of interstellar debris of the Kuiper Belt. In his haste he tracked closer to the gas giants than he had ever ventured, causing huge vortices of atmospheric disturbance from Neptune to Jupiter. Like a glowing comet he flashed across the dark between the blue world’s moon and the magnetic polar region, compressing his vast bulk as he entered the planet’s atmosphere. Burning like a fireball he burrowed beneath the crust to his reference point. There, before his gaze, the enormous energy crystals glowed, bright and fierce, already almost vertical in their alignment to each other. If they became squared off, synchronicity would be lost forever.

Putting out his thought he grappled with the crystals, fighting against their natural tendency to come together. He was aware of the music of the crystals, a vast cosmic melody, slowly changing as he fought against their entropy. Within him a counterpoint rose to meet that melody, striving to bring harmony to a growing discordance within it. The two themes strove against each other and feeling his awareness beginning to splinter, he redoubled his efforts. Fragmentation was not an option. Collecting himself he channeled all of his essence into his thought, forcing the twin pillars of light apart with the sheer force of his will.

The cost was staggering. Chron-OmiTar felt his energies drain as he willed the crystals back to their designated angles of separation. Time seemed to stand still as the bright fires slowly separated. Gradually the music in his awareness became more harmonious until finally the crystals regained synchronicity in a great burst of energy and light. Chron-OmiTar rode the energy wave out of the planet’s crust, moving out far above the plane of the ecliptic. Pausing there he floated gently in the enfolding dark, waiting for cosmic energy to replenish him as it always did. Every synchronicity event he generated left him momentarily weakened but this time he had come perilously close to absolute emptiness. It took a long time for his energies to renew.

When he recovered, he reached out with his awareness, probing the results of his actions. Below him, two globes spun in sync around their star, one glittering blue, the other dark, locked together in the beginning of a new star cycle. On the blue world, the seasons would continue. Turning back to his track he cued up his next waypoint, thinking about the event that had delayed him. Something seemed amiss with the cosmic balance of this part of the universe. He had always believed he was the sole minder in this sector of space but against the probabilities he had sensed another.
Andromeda was approaching. The Milky Way, his home, seemed destined for change. He computed that soon, maybe in just a few billion years their tracks would intersect. Chron-OmiTar would encounter another.

© Bryan Knower 2015

AFTERWHERE – a science fiction story

AfterwhereAFTERWHERE

The reverend Sebastian Archibald Castilar paused at the beginning of his weekly sermon, surveying the scattering of people spread out in the pews before him. Attendance today was worse than last Sunday and that Sunday had been worse than the previous week.
Every week, a few more people dropped out, sometimes a family, and that was hard on Sebastian Archibald’s ministry. He tried hard to whip up some fervor in the flock, doing his best to expound the doctrines of the church, but nothing seemed to work these days. He tried humor and then sternness but the response was always distressingly similar. Polite smiles and a reluctance to part with their resources. Sebastian Archibald’s church needed those resources badly and in spite of his best efforts, he was falling behind.
A slow burn of a righteous anger began to build inside him as he thought of all these complacent souls, coddled by their technology and comfortable in their regulated lives, giving scant thought to the Afterwhere even as they blithely accessed it in their dreams. Sebastian Archibald thought often about the Afterwhere. In fact, he dwelt on it. His whole purpose for being was predicated on the notion of an unpredictable Afterwhere. Wasn’t that what he was there for? To guide these folks safely through the Afterwhere?
He monitored his implants and fine tuned the vocal enhancers for a more forceful delivery. Today needed to be different.
“Uncertainty awaits you, my friends,” he thundered, pounding the pulpit for emphasis. “Life is uncertainty. You’re here today and maybe gone tomorrow. What have you done for yourselves? With yourselves? What are you in the here and now? More importantly, what do you do in the Afterwhere? Do you dread going there? Do your visits fill you with terror and your days with dread as you anticipate your next inevitable visit? Do you know what’s out there waiting for you night after night?”
He wiped a spray of spittle from his chin and noted with satisfaction that his outburst had woken up at least some of the people in the pews. Tiny green pinpoints of light glittered like fireflies throughout the room as neural implants woke up and registered activity. He re-adjusted his vocal enhancers for more dramatic effect.
“I’ll tell you what’s out there, my friends,” he continued, pointing his finger for dramatic effect. “The devil’s out there, out in the Afterwhere, waiting for those of you who step in there unprepared. Are you prepared?”
Sebastian Archibald was in fine form now, the words rolling off his tongue like waves on a shelving beach. His sonorous voice, subtly enhanced, filled the sculpted hall and The New Electric Assembly of the Afterwhere Church reverberated with his message, making the ultraglass and titanium-steel structure vibrate with delicate sympathetic harmonies.
“He’s real my friends,” Sebastian Archibald continued, “And far more devious and terrible than the abstract constructs your data ports project in your minds. He’s been around a long time and he’s been fine tuning his approach all these years. The Afterwhere Devil lurks behind the portal to the Afterwhere my friends, and he wants to add your soul identity and your memory structures to his vast network. A network of integrated misery and terror that permeates all the interstices of the dark side of the Afterwhere.”
He paused again for dramatic effect. “Are your memories safe? Do you believe the cloned synaptic images in your data banks are safe? They’re all accessible via your Identikey codes, and that’s what he steals from you in the Afterwhere. Your codes. Your After-Identity. Your personality in the Afterwhere. Is it secured? Are you prepared?”
The sweat was rolling of Sebastian Archibald’s brow now, trickling past his ears and into his gleaming tyvek collar. He ignored it. He had their attention now. All of them. The artificially dimmed auditorium was awash in green pinpoints of light, winking and glowing as their owners accessed their implants, uploading recorded copy of his words to their databanks. He smiled. That’s what they needed. A good stir of their subconscious soup to shake them out of their data-safe programmed little worlds.
The Reverend Sebastian Archibald Castilar spoke for another forty-five minutes, each one of them more dire and dolorous than the previous. He stormed around the sanctuary gesticulating wildly, his ornate metal-fiber robes glittering as the strobes of the mood lighting caught them. The lighting operator seemed to have caught the fervor of the moment. She had three flash beams trained on the reverend at all times, making him appear to glow of his own accord. The fog machines rolled their heavy white clouds across the floor of the sanctuary and the reverend seemed to float about the room like a spectral apparition.
Just before his closing statements, the reverend linked his interface to the building systems and artificially darkened the ultraglass walls of the church, a signal to the lighting operator, who responded with a frenzy of strobe lighting simulating lightning strikes around the cunningly silhouetted figure of the reverend. For a few minutes there in the Church of the New Electric Assembly of the Afterwhere, it seemed as if the Afterwhere had indeed become the present.
“You are doomed, all of you. Doomed to an eternity of endless grinding repetition. Repetition of the most unbearable horrors your minds can envision. But all is not lost. I can help you. I can show you the way through the Afterwhere.”
He paused to let the idea sink in. The green fireflies flickered madly.
“Open your data ports to my uplink stream, my brothers and sisters. Do it now. Do it every day. Do it before you fall asleep and your dreams take you where you do not want to go.”
He raised his voice a few more decibels and lowered the pitch and the timbre, going for the payoff now.
“I have what you need. I will show you a safe road. A safe road through the Afterwhere.”
He stormed out through the mirrorblind curtains at the back of the sanctuary as his closing words echoed in an infinite loop through the church sound system, ten thousand watts of amplified reverberated exhortation that hung in the air long after he had departed, leaving the members pinned to their seats like butterflies on a display board.
That night, the reverend’s uplink stream pulsed as it had not in a very long time. The church servers frantically added more bandwidth as more and more people opened their data ports to his stream. The Unicredit counters monitoring his revenue stream blinked madly as his message downloaded across the data spectrum. The credits poured in faster than his mind could register, and the reverend felt a warm glow of happiness at his achievement, but he was already thinking ahead, knowing he needed to maintain the intensity to keep that credit flow active.
Boredom was the bane of this jaded world he lived in; every aspect of life and living regulated, controlled and monitored by robot processes to the point of mundane invisibility. The only escape for a largely process controlled population was through dreams, themselves monitored by robotic AI’s that randomized the outcomes of those visits so that no person visited the exact same scenario repeatedly. The Afterwhere was a logical construct to exercise the subconscious portions of the mind that could not be controlled by the robots, and lately, the Afterwhere had grown increasingly dark. The reverend’s church was a response to a growing emotional need.
Sebastian Archibald needed to keep the fears of his flock alive, their terror of the Afterwhere stoked, so that the New Electric Assembly of the Afterwhere Church continued to grow. And he along with it. As he pondered the problem he had an idea. He had posited a devil. They were terrified of that devil. So why not give him to them?
He would give them that very devil. The Afterwhere Devil, live and present via malware that would upload through their data ports and infect their implants subtly, making them receptive to his suggestions. His very own controllable Afterwhere Devil.
The Reverend Sebastian Archibald Castilar did not sleep that night, turning possibilities and outcomes over in his mind until he had crystallized what he wanted. Early next morning he placed a video comm call to an old friend of his who made robots for a living. His friend had done very well for himself, considering that most of the world was now run and regulated by robots of every shape, size, texture and capacity. The call was short and Sebastian Archibald was precise in his requirements.
Could his friend build him a robot interface to his exact specifications?
He could? Good!
Could he do it in a week? Two weeks? Great!
Could he tailor the robot personality to match the criteria he would specify? Excellent!
The price? What?
Well, never mind. There was going to be a lot more where that was coming from. Do it!
Minutes later, Sebastian Archibald had uploaded a hyper-security packet to his friend, with detailed instructions regarding the personality and capabilities of his new robot interface. The reverend was building himself a robot devil. An Afterwhere Devil, no less.
The next two weeks saw a feverish build up of intensity at the New Electric Assembly of the Afterwhere Church. Sebastian Archibald installed pheromone enhancers in the ceiling, subliminal message displays on the back wall of the sanctuary and upgraded the lights and sound before the next gathering. He posted prominent instructions at the entrance that all neural implants should have their firewalls lowered within the church and their receptors enabled.
The church was packed. Word had spread amongst the community that the reverend was onto something. He had a handle on the Afterwhere. He knew the pitfalls within that desolation and how to avoid them. People brought friends. Families brought other families. They sat mesmerized as the reverend expounded on his theme. This time he had visual backup. Giant displays behind him punctuated his words, picturing dismal dystopian futurescapes as Sebastian Archibald described the dangers of the Afterwhere. Subliminal messages pulsed invisibly in the background and the pheromone enhancers pumped the atmosphere full of disquiet and lurking terror as the images rolled on, bleaker by the moment.
At the end of the sermon, Sebastian Archibald was drenched in sweat and so was his audience. They sat slack-jawed in their seats as the reverend choreographed the finale of his performance like a circus ringmaster. The Unicredit input following the service far outstripped the previous week. The reverend’s net worth soared like a spaceship leaving orbit and his visage began popping up on the national buzz feeds, feeding the frenzy. He was a shark in a school of mackerel. He was the titan at the gates of the Afterwhere, the holder of a VIP access pass guaranteeing a good time to be had by all who could afford it. He was unstoppable.
The next week, the week before the devil arrived, he worked himself into a frenzy, foaming at the mouth as he frightened the wits out of those gathered in his church. There were so many people waiting to get in that he set up five services, spaced and hour and a half apart, all of them playing to capacity crowds. By evening the reverend was exhausted but edgy with anticipation. He dismissed his staff, telling them to take the next day off as a bonus for their work at the services and waited for the technicians who would install his dream device.
It was well into the early hours of the morning before the techs were done interfacing the new system with his servers. Sebastian Archibald could barely contain himself as he waited for them to leave. He sat in front of the interface terminal, brimming with anticipation. What devilry would he program for his first week’s rummaging inside his unsuspecting members memory data banks?
A small glittering dot appeared in the center of the display, resolving into a buckyball shaped figure that spun rapidly on the screen before him. The buckyball had many glittering rainbow-colored facets that flashed and winked mesmerizingly. Behind the interface, his data port came alive, servers humming urgently; data access monitors blinking rapidly in synchronization with the rotating buckyball.
The reverend was mildly irritated. He hadn’t activated the devil interface yet but the damn thing was obviously on. No matter, The technicians probably initialized the system before they left. Clearing his throat he stared directly at the buckyball and accessed the audio interface.
“Castilar. Log on and register vocal and retina print.”
The spinning buckyball flashed silver for a moment before turning prismatic again.
“Vocal and retina print confirmed. Welcome Sebastian.”
Something prickled in the back of the reverend’s mind, like an itch on the inside of his skull. He squeezed his eyes shut and shook his head. When he opened his eyes, the sensation was gone.
Sebastian. The system had called him Sebastian, but he had not told it his name. No one called the reverend by his name. His was simple The Reverend. Sebastian Archibald Castilar guarded his personality with a fervor that matched his religious zeal.
The buckyball on the screen grew in size, some of the facets disappearing into dark openings like windows into an infinite depth. Inside those lattices sparks flashed into existence and died. The room lights dimmed and the unmistakable coppery odor of pheromone stimulants wafted into his nostrils. On the display he could see the reflected green LED of his own implant flare into activity.
A nameless dread assailed him as a suave voice bearing a hint of mingled mischief and malice echoed inside his head.
“Sebastian Archibald Castilar. Welcome to the Afterwhere. I’m your host, the Afterwhere Devil.”

 © Bryan Knower: September 2014

I am a phoenix

BryanSorry for the slightly pompous title of this post, but it’s been so long since I last posted that I do feel somewhat like the mythical bird. I see that my last post was in April, five months ago. At the time, I felt that creating and editing the short stories that I post to the blog were taking up too much of my time, preventing me from working on long-form writing. Also, I noticed that my blog stories were getting longer, breaking the mold of flash or short-short fiction. Clearly I needed to write longer. So I decided to get back to the long-form for a bit and take a hiatus from the adrenaline rush of writing short-short stories.

There have been positives and negatives. On the plus side, I am almost finished with a SF novel that I began last year. Soon it will be edit and re-write time. Need a break before that. On the minus side, I miss the quick thrill of writing and posting short stories. They’re very addictive to create and withdrawing from the process takes a toll, as I found out.

Anyway, my birthday is coming around and I though I’d treat myself by dabbling once again. I set out to write a piece of flash fiction, maybe six hundred plus words but not more than a thousand. Alas for my good intentions, I got carried away (like I usually do) and by the time I finished, a day later, the story was twenty-three hundred plus words and no longer flash fiction. Not even a short-short story. Still, I had fun writing it. I got the idea off an obscure writing prompt and ended up with a dystopian urban science fiction tale.

It’s called AFTERWHERE,  listed on the main page and also tagged as “Short Story”. Hope you like it.

Sierra Madre Blues

Sierra Madre BluesSIERRA MADRE BLUES

veryshortstoriesSebastian Crist first noticed her when he parked his bike and walked down to the spring by the roadside. If he had not stopped for a drink of fresh water and a toke he might never have seen her up on the hillside. She lay curled up against a jumble of rocks some distance up the slope from the spring, seemingly asleep.

Maybe she fell. Maybe she was injured. What was she doing up here?

The sheer absurdity of someone out here in the remote wilderness of the Sierra Madre Mountains made him think he was hallucinating. Maybe he was imagining what he saw. He closed eyes for a few seconds, but when he re-opened them, the girl was still there. He realized then that something was very wrong. Wrong for him and possibly wrong with him.

He had stopped near a small culvert on Route 166, the old Sierra Madre highway from Guadalupe to Taft. A ghost road, haunted by coyotes and rattlesnakes. A road less travelled. Sebastian knew the road well. He had ridden it before, exulting in the feeling of freedom as he pushed the motorcycle around the bends on the deserted highway. The deep thrum of the Indian’s big engine between his legs and the shattering roar of his passage through the numerous cuts and gullies was like a balm to his soul and these days, his soul felt in desperate need of soothing.

Leaving his bike by the side of the road, he scrambled up the slope to where she lay, a sense of foreboding growing in him as he approached her. It wasn’t until he was within a few feet of her that he realized she was dead.

Her throat had been cut from ear to ear, a red gaping slash that grinned at him from beneath her chin like an obscene mouth. His stomach heaving, Sebastian fell to his knees, bile spewing from his mouth, burning his throat and nostrils as he wretched. Images from the nightmares that haunted his dreams filled his mind, tightening his gut until he doubled over with the pain. He willed the dead girl to go away but in his mind, she beckoned to others, the fey spirits from his past that hounded him, taunting him, daring him to react, to do more than run away.

He always ran, literally and figuratively. In every instance he left the scene in a panic, reliving the macabre details in the nights that followed, unable to understand what he encountered. He never knew if the encounters were real or just twisted figments of his imagination, and he told nobody. His prior arrest record took care of that and he had no illusions about what might ensure from reporting such an event.

It all began two summers ago, on an evening just like this one in the Arizona desert. Days after a desert rave, high on Peyote extract, seeing the colors of the rainbow reflected in the hot sand; amorphous shapes swirling around him, imaginary or real, ghosts of the future, phantoms of the past, all of them female, all dead, speaking silently to him, commanding him.

Time seemed to stand still and voices spoke inside his head, telling him about unspeakable things, asking him if he was ready. He struggled in vain against their hideous insinuations, fighting desperately for control over his slipping mind, alternately pleading and ranting at them.

What do you want? Why me? I don’t understand. Tell me. What do you want?

It is your legacy, they said. Why do you resist?

It was not what he wanted to hear, so he ran, fleeing the desert, sweating out the peyote in terrified hallucinations night after night, trying to convince himself that it was all a result of a bad trip. The fault of the peyote buttons.

He felt exactly the same now, the urge to run paramount in his mind. He fought it, squeezing his eyes shut again, hoping this was all in his head. It didn’t help. In the desolate landscape around him, there was no sign of anyone, savior or pursuer, an absence of anything but the two of them, Sebastian and the girl, alone and surrounded by silence.

The quiet was unnatural, a stepping out of time, a time where lips moved, a time where limbs beckoned, gesturing; a time for drowned ears, like a face underwater, everything observed through a watery lens, eyes open without goggles, all clearly obscure.

In Cuidad Juarez, the dead girl’s eyes had looked like that, opaque, unseeing, accusing.

Why didn’t you do something? Where were you when they were killing me?

He had denied responsibility. Vehemently.

Not me. It wasn’t me. I’m trying to help but you’re already dead. Please, I’ll do what I can. Poor dead senorita. Don’t look at me like that. I’m so sorry, but it’s too late.

Avoid the accusing stare, the marks of her desecration and his shame. So young, so innocent, just like this girl huddled among the rocks up in the Sierra Madre Mountains. He was too late for her also, just as he had been too late for the girl in Cuidad, too late to help, too late to prevent the shame, the tearing, the mutilation. He wanted to scream.

Why me? It isn’t my fault.

There was no escaping it. Every one of them different but still the same. Mouths open, the ghostly image of a silent scream frozen on bloodless lips, a record of final agony endured, the rictus of desperation morphing from the phantoms in the desert to the silent accusations of the girl in Cuidad. Same expression of surprise, desolation and pain, with Sebastian standing immobile, rooted, frozen in time and space, all the desperation of all the lonely souls robbed of life and love pressing him on that rocky hillside with the sunlight fading like the hope in his heart.

Alone. That’s how you died. Alone. A solitary journey. A solitary experience.

And he was a solitary man. Always had been. Often wondered why. Adamantly refused to face the answer. Even though a dead girl lay before him, he was alone.

Sweat dripped from his hair onto his forehead. He did not notice. It ran into his eyes. He blinked, trying to release the moisture, but his eyes stung.

Sweat or tears? I don’t know. I don’t care. What now? Why do I see dead people?

Perhaps it was time to change the status quo. In retrospect, everything had the clarity of clear glass. In Cuidad, he had not moved the body of the girl. He did not move this one either. She was fresh, like a newly killed deer, the strange sweet smell of blood strong in the air; an unforgettable smell. He had done nothing then, self-preservation his dominant instinct. He made an effort now, for monsters were nearby, watching him as he got his blanket from his bike and covered her with it, watching him as he made his way back down the hill and kicked the bike back into life, watching him as he sat astride his softly muttering Indian, contemplating what to do next.

In the desert, he ran from the collective consciousness that beckoned him. He had run from the girl in Cuidad too, run from faceless and unseen retribution, and he meant to run now, from the nameless something that waited up the mountainside for him. In spite of his sputtering resolve the specters called to him, tempting him, beckoning, like so many times before. And in the forefront was the girl he had just left. The girl on the mountainside. The girl with the red smile. A smile that implored with the others.

Stay. Stay and be part of us. We are the same. Come be with us.

He rode away then; the accusation of that bloody grimace imprinted on his mind like a ghostly afterimage, and in the very edges of his vision, a ghostly company rode with him. And with them the dead girl in the Sierra Madre Mountains, now part of that endless expanding circle, reciting the litany of something he still refused to figure out.

Bryan Knower 2014

TRANSIENT: A Short Short Story

transient02TRANSIENT

Short Short StoryA hazy beam of sunlight throws a vertical swath of light on the wall, making a bright smear on the washed out pattern of the wallpaper. The paper must have been ivory colored once, but now it is a dirty shade of cream, fading to yellowish brown. The peeling edges lift off the wall like the curling dog-eared pages of a well worn book, in places torn to reveal the dull blue of an earlier print. Along the path the sunlight takes as it creeps up the wall, the paper has bleached, evidence of long tenure.

In a corner across from the window, an iron frame bed leans drunkenly against the wall, looking like it might collapse without additional support. The frame was once painted black, but all vestiges of color have peeled away, leaving only bare metal, interspersed with darker splotches of rust that contrast vividly with the incongruous emerald green of the coverlet. The bedspread seems relatively new and the small images of romping cats scattered across the surface seem like a sick joke in contrast to the severity of the room. At the foot of the bed stands a battered brown suitcase, its leather scuffed and scratched. The zippers are broken, the tabs missing and the case is now secured by two straps, curling and worn smooth from much use.

There’s a wooden clothes horse in the left corner, adjoining the window. On its rungs hang a faded pair of blue jeans along with two threadbare grayish t-shirts. The shirts may have been black once, but repeated washing seems to have leached all the color from them.

The other corner hosts a small metal table and a folding chair. Paraphernalia litters the table; a thin length of latex rubber lies like a flaccid snakeskin beside a tarnished silver spoon and a partially used spirit lamp. A disposable hypodermic syringe has rolled to a stop against the lamp, and resting near it is a crumpled scrap of foil paper, an orphan from the overflowing ashtray.

The ashtray, once the property of the Happy Family Peking Diner, is the cheap tin kind that everybody steals. The remnants of a dozen cigarette butts, the unfiltered kind, fill the bowl. The ash tray, once gilded, is now black with the detritus of innumerable mashed out smokes. The smell of stale tobacco fights for supremacy with the scent of Lysol air freshener, creating a strange pungent odor that is not altogether unpleasant.

The sunlight barely illuminates the room, even though it is still early afternoon. The window is grimy, and the inside surface is streaked as if someone has tried to scrub it clean with paper. The outside of the glass pane is spotted and patchy where raindrops briefly liquefied some of the grime before hardening it into a new pattern; layer upon layer of cloudy whorls that filter out most of the light. The view outside is bleak; dominated by the brown brick wall of another building, all the windows shuttered. The light in the room will vanish when the setting sun disappears behind the rooftop of that building.

A single light bulb hangs from the ceiling by a length of wire, as grimy as the window itself. The bulb is bare and unlit. In the wan light diffusing into the room, the wooden floor seems streaked, the result of many repairs that have matched neither the grain nor the type and shade of the wood. The boards look stained and dull, the surface lacquer long since gone and the wood darkened to a chocolate luster with age.

The sound of a jack hammer drifts up through the imperfect window seal, the rhythmic clatter mingling with the sound of shouted voices from out in the hallway. On the other side of the wall, a baby cries, providing a monotonous background to the rhythmic thud-thud of a boom box with the bass turned up loud. The walls are like acoustically permeable membranes, making privacy altogether impossible.

A cheap mirror hangs on the back of the closed door, reflecting the interior of the room in unflattering detail. Above the mirror, someone has screwed in a couple of cheap metal hooks. A white bathrobe, relatively new, occupies one of the hooks, a puffy cumulus smudge against the dull leaden backdrop of the door. It is one of the few things in the room, along with the suitcase and the jeans, that clearly belongs to someone.

Curiously, there are no electrical or mechanical contrivances of any kind in the room. This, added to the lack of furniture, makes the room appear bigger than it really is, an illusion accented by its Spartan emptiness. The entire aspect is one of impermanence, as if the entire room is transient, primed to transform in a moment at its owner’s whim. But there is no living thing here. There hasn’t been for days. Eventually, the landlord will come looking. Come when the pre-paid rent has run out. But by then the Lysol scent will be long gone, replaced by the growing odor of putrescence and the grotesquely swollen foot and ankle protruding from under the trailing edge of that emerald green coverlet.

Bryan Knower 2014

DESOLATION SPACE: a poem of the apocalypse

desolation space

DESOLATION SPACE

In the lava lands of despair
A pale rider roams a blighted tableau
Seeking out the random detritus
Of discarded human experience
The silent satiation of an immeasurable appetite
Unquenchable and desperately ravening
The devourer of souls in torment
Merciless she, whose face no living thing has looked upon
Nor desires such, even in nightmare vision

In the lava lands of despair
Beyond the origins of the watchers by night
The horsemen of the coming apocalypse
Embrace the trauma of desolation space
Unbroken through the dawn of time
Wherein lies the terrible endings of all sanity
Ripped in shreds from the marrow of conscious thought
Ribbons of ideality, now corrupted
In the endless churning tendrils of deviance

In the lava lands of despair
Where the seeds of karma come home to die
Hope lies bleeding and broken hearted
Sallow in the face of shattered vanity
Victim of the crimson veil of pride
Offerings for the unspeakable and the unknowable
Who dwell on the crags and in the crannies
Populating the architecture of dismal everywhere
Even in the molten pools of carnal lust
Amid the decayed remnants of noble aspirations

In the lava lands of despair
Amongst the broken bones of vanished leviathan
Nothingness grows its creeping envelope
Subsuming all beneath the weight of eons
Time before time, the accretion of millennia
An infinite mobius loop of decadence
The siren call of temptation unfettered
Clamoring for relief where none may exist
Abandon hope all ye who wander here
Between the shadow walls and the gargantuan deeps

In the lava lands of despair
Where all may enter but none may leave
An express invitation to the armpit of perdition
Where the galleries of the behemoth of time
Unravel in all their endless multiplicity
Trolling the blasted labyrinth for benighted souls
Moldering husks of once shining idealism
Now strewn like dust in the debris of abandonment
Beyond redemption, or resurrection or revelation
In the lava lands of despair

Bryan Knower 2014